Alleged Founding Zetas Drug Cartel Member Extradited to the US

September 12, 2012

Fox News Latino on September 12, 2012 released the following:

“MEXICO CITY – Mexico extradited one of the founding members of the ultra violent Zetas drug cartel to the U.S. on Tuesday where he is wanted for the alleged involvement in the killing of a U.S. customs agent, authorities said.

Jesús Enrique Rejón Aguilar was turned over to U.S. authorities to face drug-trafficking charges in Washington, Mexico’s Attorney General’s Office said in a statement.

Rejón is identified as third in command of the Zetas, which over a decade went from being the military arm of the Gulf Cartel to having its own drug-trafficking organization. He was one of Mexico’s most-wanted men and the U.S. State Department had offered a $5 million reward for information leading to his arrest.

Mexican authorities say Rejón was the leader of a Zetas cell accused of fatally shooting U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent Jaime Zapata and wounding fellow agent Victor Avila in February 2011 while they drove on a highway in San Luis Potosi state.

Mexican federal police captured him the following July outside Mexico City in the town of Atizapan.

Rejón entered the Mexican army in 1993 and three years later joined an elite unit. In 1997, he was assigned as an agent of the Attorney General’s Office in northern Mexico. Two years later, he deserted and is alleged to have then helped found the Zetas, at first working as security for the head of the Gulf Cartel.

The Zetas are blamed for much of the violence that has resulted in more than 47,000 people being killed in Mexican drug violence since December 2006, when President Felipe Calderón launched a military offensive against the cartels.

Elsewhere on Tuesday, soldiers clashed with gunmen in the northern state of Tamaulipas, across the border from Texas, killing four, state prosecutors said in a statement.

Soldiers first clashed with armed men in a residential area of Reynosa, a city across from McAllen, Texas, killing one man. A second shootout at an empty lot killed three more gunmen, prosecutors said.

“Because of this, criminal groups blocked several city streets with trailer trucks and public buses to obstruct the arrival of the military and police forces,” the prosecutors’ statement said.

The industrial city of Reynosa is believed to be a stronghold of the Gulf Cartel.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

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We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Mexico here.

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Yakima man wanted for murder extradited from Mexico

May 26, 2012

KIMATV.com on May 25, 2012 released the following:

“By Tyler Slauson & Michael Spears

YAKIMA, Wash. — One of America’s Most Wanted is now back in Yakima. Police in Mexico captured Jose Ayala at the end of last year.

Ayala was wanted for murdering his girlfriend back in 2008 and was featured on America’s Most Wanted.

Part of the extradition agreement included a cap on his sentencing range if found guilty of second degree murder.

” When Mexico is going to release someone to the U.S. They can’t be looking at more than 25-years in prison, they’re not eligible for any death penalty cases. So that’s sort of the big cut off,’ said Deputy U.S. Marshal Jeff Marty.

Ayala made his first court appearance in Yakima Friday.

YAKIMA POLICE NEWS RELEASE — On Thursday May 24, 2012 Jose A. Ayala 22 YOA was extradited from Mexico by US Marshals and handed over to Yakima Police Detectives at SeaTac International Airport.

Ayala was booked last night by Yakima Police Detectives into the Yakima County Jail on the charge of Murder 2nd Degree Domestic Violence.

Ayala was wanted in relation to the October 22, 2008 homicide of his girlfriend Yesenia Haro.

Ayala has been in custody in Mexico since November, 2011 awaiting extradition.

Yakima Police Detectives, Yakima County Prosecutor’s Office, United States Marshal Service and the United State Department of Justice worked together on the extradition process.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

————————————————————–

We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Mexico here.

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call: mcnabb.mcnabbassociates

           Office Locations

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Suspect in Child Molestation Case Extradited from Mexico

September 8, 2011

A suspected child molester wanted in Escondido was extradited to the United States on Wednesday after being arrested in Mexico, according to the Escondido Police Department.

Ricardo Lopez Borbon was booked into the Vista jail on two counts of child molestation and a charge of parole violation, Lt. Craig Carter said. The molestation charges stem from an incident that occurred Aug. 17, 2009, authorities said.

On that date, officers were called to investigate a sexual assault involving a 9-year-old girl. The victim was visiting an auto shop in the 1000 block of West Mission Avenue when a man assaulted her.

The officers found few leads in the case, Carter said. However, the following day, Escondido detectives received a call about a registered sex offender living in the city who had cut off his electronic monitoring device, Carter said.

Through questioning, detectives determined that the registrant was the suspect in the molestation case, Carter said. Eventually, a $2 million warrant was issued on Lopez Borbon, a naturalized U.S. citizen, police said.

During their investigation, authorities found that the suspect was in Mexico, police said. On Oct. 6, 2010, Mexican authorities arrested the man and began extradition procedures.

Lopez Borbon is scheduled to be arraigned Friday at the courthouse in Vista.

This article was written by Edward Sifuentes and published by the North County Times on September 7, 2011.

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Minnesota Man and Possibly Abducted Wife Found in Mexico

August 9, 2011

Timothy Caskey to be extradited from Matamoros.

The FBI and United States Marshals announced on Monday that Timothy Caskey has been arrested without incident at a bank in Matamoros, Mexico. His estranged wife, who has been missing since July 14, was also found.

Mexican State Police officials made the arrest at about 2 p.m. CDT, and Caskey is now awaiting extradition to the United States. His initial appearance in San Antonio federal court has not yet been scheduled.

Caskey had been sought on federal and state kidnapping warrants — as well as a state false imprisonment charge and a parole violation warrant issued by the Minnesota Department of Corrections that stemmed from a July 14 incident when Caskey was accused of kidnapping his estranged wife, Roberta Lynn Caskey.

Timothy Caskey is also a person of interest in a July 15 bank robbery in Ottowa, Kan., and in the theft of a pickup truck from a used car lot in New Braunfels, Texas, on July 16.

The Caskeys were tracked to the town of Matamoros by U.S. marshals and FBI agents who sought and received the help of Mexican State Police.

Police say Roberta Lynn Caskey will return to Minnesota in the near future, and appeared distraught when she was recovered by Mexican authorities, but no further information about her sate of health was released.

This article was written by Shelby Capacio and published by FOX 9 News on August 8, 2011.

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Mexico Extradites Flight Attendant Who Set Fire on U.S. Flight

August 5, 2011

Latin American Herald Tribune on August 4, 2011 released the following:

“MEXICO CITY – The Mexican Attorney General’s Office said Thursday it extradited a former flight attendant who had fled the United States after his arrest for setting fire to a plane’s bathroom.

Eder H. Rojas, a Mexican national, was wanted for extradition by a federal court in North Dakota for setting the fire 35 minutes after the Compass Airlines flight carrying 76 people took off in 2008 from Minneapolis bound for Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Rojas, then 19, another flight attendant and a passenger extinguished the blaze after the fire alarm sounded, but the plane still was forced make an emergency landing in the North Dakota city of Fargo.

After being questioned by FBI agents, Rojas confessed that he was upset with the airline for making him work the Minneapolis-Regina route and that was why he used a lighter to set fire to a packet of toilet paper in the plane’s bathroom.

Other flight crew members testified that Rojas had asked for an extra packet of toilet paper before the plane took off and that led investigators to suspect the Mexican, who eventually confessed.

After his arrest, the suspect escaped from a low-security detention facility and fled across the border into Mexico.

Rojas was subsequently arrested in Mexico by Federal Police officers and jailed in Mexico City, the AG’s office said in a statement.

The Mexican government extradited Rojas after he had exhausted all avenues of appeal and the suspect was handed over at the Mexico City airport to a group of U.S. Marshals, the AG’s office said.

Rojas faces up to 20 years in prison. EFE”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Suspect Arrested in Slayings of US Consulate Employees

August 1, 2011

Mexican authorities have arrested a former federal police officer accused of ordering 1,500 killings during a campaign of terrorism along the U.S.-Mexico border and masterminding the attack last year that killed a U.S. Consulate employee, her husband and the husband of another Consulate worker in Ciudad Juarez.

Jose Antonio Acosta Hernandez, charged with 34 other Barrio Azteca gang members and associates of murder, racketeering, drug offenses, money laundering and obstruction of justice, was captured Friday in the northern city of Chihuahua, Mexican federal police announced Sunday.

The arrest was hailed by Mexican President Felipe Calderon, who sent 5,000 federal police to Ciudad Juarez in April 2010 to rein in bloodshed in one of the world’s most violent cities – located across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas.

“It is the biggest strike in the Ciudad Juarez operation. Congratulations,” he wrote on his Twitter feed in Spanish.

Mexican police conducted their customary “perp walk” Sunday for reporters and their cameras in Mexico. Mr. Acosta was described as a short man with a cleft chin and thick eyebrows, who was limping while police took him into the room. The officers were masked, as also is customary.

Mr. Acosta, 33, nicknamed “El Diego,” also was among 10 Mexican nationals indicted in March by a federal grand jury in the western district of Texas in the March 13 killings in Mexico of U.S. Consulate employee Leslie Ann Enriquez Catton; her husband, Arthur Redelfs; and Jorge Alberto Salcido Ceniceros, the husband of a U.S. Consulate employee.

U.S. prosecutors want to try Mr. Acosta in that case, and Mexican authorities said they expect to receive an extradition request from the U.S. government.

Enriquez, 25, who worked at the U.S. Consulate in Juarez, and her husband, Redelfs, 30, were U.S. citizens. They were killed when Mexican drug gang members fired shots at their sport utility vehicle as they left a birthday party.

Redelfs was a 10-year veteran of the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office. Enriquez was four months pregnant with the couple’s second child. Their 7-month-old daughter was found unharmed in the back seat.

That same day, Salcido, 37, a Mexican citizen whose wife also was an employee at the U.S. Consulate in Juarez, was killed when cartel members shot at his car at a separate location, also wounding his two young children. They had attended the same birthday party.

Ramon Pequeno, head of the Mexican Federal Police anti-drug unit, identified Mr. Acosta as the boss of La Linea, a gang of hit men and corrupt police officers who act as enforcers for the Juarez drug cartel.

Mr. Acosta was one of Mexico’s most-wanted criminals, with officials offering a reward of $1.3 million for his arrest.

Mr. Pequeno, who said Mr. Acosta’s arrest involved collaboration with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, accused Mr. Acosta of being connected to some of Juarez’s most notorious violence over the past two years, including the 2010 killing of a state prosecutor, a car bombing outside a police station and a massacre at a house party that killed 15 people – most of whom had no ties to organized crime.

U.S. law enforcement officials said the Barrio Azteca gang began in the late 1980s as a violent prison gang and expanded into a transnational criminal organization based primarily in West Texas.

The gang also operates in the border town of Juarez and throughout state and federal prisons in the United States and Mexico. They said the gang’s specialties include drug trafficking, money laundering, extortion, intimidation, violence, threats of violence and murder.

Also named in the indictment were Eduardo Ravelo, Luis Mendez, Arturo Gallegos Castrellon, Ricardo Valles de la Rosa, Jose Guadalupe Diaz Diaz, Martin Perez Marrufo, Luis Humberto Hernandez Celis, Miguel Angel Nevarez and Enrique Guajardo Lopez. They are charged with conspiracy to kill people in a foreign country, murder and murder in aid of racketeering.

The U.S. government has filed provisional warrants with Mexico for their arrests.Ravelo is one of the FBI’s Top 10 Most Wanted fugitives, and the FBI is offering a reward of up to $100,000 for information leading directly to his arrest.

In addition to the consulate slayings, the indictment claims that in December 2006, a gang member fatally shot Jose Luis Oviedo in El Paso. In 2007, gang members are said to have kidnapped a man in El Paso and took him across the U.S.-Mexico border to Juarez. In March 2008, the gang is said to have ordered the slaying of gang member David Merez, who was killed that same month in Juarez.

The indictment also says that the gang caused two people to be fatally shot in Socorro, Texas, on July 2, 2009. In August 2010, the indictment says, gang members kidnapped the wife and parents of a gang member who they thought was cooperating with U.S. law enforcement and also killed the member’s stepdaughter.

This article was written by Jerry Seper and published by the Washington Times on July 31, 2011.

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Man Accused of Murdering his Estranged Wife and Unborn Child Extradited from Mexico

July 28, 2011

A man accused in the stabbing death of his estranged wife, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer, was extradited to Chula Vista, California on Wednesday from Mexico.

Jesus Arteaga Garcia, 30, will be charged in the death of Maribel Arteaga, 28, and her unborn child. She was two months pregnant when she was fatally stabbed on Dec. 9, 2009, at her Chula Vista apartment in front of the couple’s two sons, who were ages 4 and 6 at the time.

Chula Vista police investigated and obtained an arrest warrant for Arteaga, who was believed at the time to have fled to Mexico to avoid prosecution.

On Jan. 28, Mexican federal authorities, working with deputies from the U.S. Marshals Service, arrested Arteaga in Tijuana near his sister’s apartment. He was being held in Mexico City before extradition.

On Wednesday, U.S. Marshals Service deputies transported him to San Diego and released him to the custody of Chula Vista police investigators. He will face two counts of murder, two counts of child abuse, and a special circumstances allegation for committing more than one murder. He was being held in county jail on a no-bail warrant.

At the time of the arrest, Deputy U.S. Marshal Steve Jurman said that Arteaga was receiving assistance in Tijuana from his sister and his parents, who also live there.

Maribel Arteaga worked as a customs officer at the Tecate Port of Entry.

Her estranged husband had come to her apartment, and the two had argued about the visitation of their children, authorities said. She was stabbed in the back with a long-blade knife and died at a hospital. Before she died, she identified her estranged husband as the assailant.

Chula Vista Police Chief David Bejarano called the extradition “another important step in bringing justice to Maribel’s family.”

Jurman said earlier that relatives in Tijuana were apparently sympathetic to Jesus Arteaga, and that during interviews with authorities, they said that “Maribel got what she deserved.”

This article was written by Susan Schroder and published by Sign On San Diego on July 27, 2011.

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Alleged Mexican Drug Trafficker Extradited to U.S.

December 13, 2010

A suspected Mexican drug gang leader linked to a 2006 border incursion by armed traffickers into Texas has been extradited by Mexico to the United States., the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and the U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Texas have said.

The U.S. authorities said Saturday that Jose Rodolfo Escajeda, also known as “Rikin,” was extradited to the U.S. to stand trial on marijuana and cocaine trafficking charges.

Escajeda, who allegedly worked for the Juarez cartel, was indicted by the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas in 2006.

U.S. authorities said that from a base in Guadalupe in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, Escajeda is alleged to have controlled a drug trafficking corridor for marijuana and cocaine in the area of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, located across from El Paso, Texas.

The U.S. has sought his extradition since his arrest by Mexican authorities in September 2009.

In January 2006, at least 10 men in Mexican military-style uniforms crossed the Rio Grande into the United States while on a marijuana-smuggling foray. That led to an armed confrontation with Texas law officers near Neely’s Crossing, Texas, about 50 miles east of El Paso. Both the U.S. officials and the smugglers had their weapons drawn, but no shots were fired. The smugglers escaped back into Mexico, but did leave behind about a half-ton of marijuana.

When he was arrested last year, the Mexican army said in a statement that Escajeda was also presumably responsible for the killing of anti-crime activist Benjamin LeBaron and a neighbor in Mexico.

The battle between the Mexican drug cartels and U.S. authorities is no secret. The cartels in Juarez have forced a spotlight upon themselves due to their proximity to El Paso and the increase of violent crimes within the Mexican city.

U.S. officials have been working closely with the Mexican government to extradite and prosecute alleged drug dealers and traffickers in the U.S. The U.S. judicial and prison system is thought to be more efficient than the comparable processes in Mexico. Moreover, the Mexican prison system is thought to be dangerous, and many offenders are killed in prison before trial ever begins.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, Interpol Litigation, International Extradition and OFAC Litigation.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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UPDATE: Mexican Government Grants Extradition Request for “La Barbie”

November 22, 2010

Mexican officials said Saturday they have begun the process to extradite alleged drug kingpin Edgar Valdez, known as “La Barbie” for his fair looks, to the United States on drug trafficking charges.

Valdez, a U.S. national born in Laredo, Texas, is charged in a 2002 indictment in Louisiana for alleged cocaine trafficking, and a 1998 indictment for drug trafficking in Texas.

The bilingual Valdez, 37, was arrested on August 30 in a police raid in central Mexico. Known as a ruthless killer, Mexican officials blame him for scores of murders across the country, especially in the southern tourist resort of Acapulco.

As previously reported, Valdez specifically requested extradition to the United States to face the charges. Several motives might exist for this request, such as the fear of being killed in Mexico’s dangerous prisons or perhaps the possibility of providing U.S. authorities with information regarding Mexican drug cartels in exchange for a plea agreement.

A judge ordered Valdez detained pending extradition, the office of Mexico’s attorney general said in a statement.

Valdez was moved to the maximum security prison of El Altiplano, in the central state of Mexico, until the months-long extradition process has been completed.

Valez was a key lieutenant of Arturo Beltran Leyva, who headed the cartel that bears his name and was Mexico’s third most-wanted man until he was killed in a military raid in December 2009.

As a head of Beltran Leyva’s hit squad, “La Barbie” allegedly engaged in a bloody gang war with Arturo’s brother Hector for control of the Beltran Leyva organization.

Since his arrest the Mexican government had not pressed charges, and President Felipe Calderon was forced to deny talk that Valdez negotiated his surrender.

The U.S. State Department had offered up to two million dollars for information leading to his arrest and capture, and Mexican authorities offered 2.2 million dollars.

“La Barbie” is one of six drug lords the government says it has captured or killed this year in Mexico.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, Interpol Litigation, International Extradition and OFAC Litigation.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Alleged Mexican Drug Kingpin ‘La Barbie’ Seeks Extradition to U.S.

September 13, 2010

Edgar Valdez Villareal, a U.S.-born alleged drug lord who was captured in Mexico last week, wants to return to his roots in Texas to face trial rather than stay in a Mexican jail, his lawyer said.

Valdez, called “La Barbie” in Mexico for his green eyes and sandy colored hair, has a reputation for beheading opponents in Mexico’s violent drug wars. He fears that he will get killed in a Mexican prison, according to Kent Schaffer, his Houston-based lawyer.

Schaffer asked U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Carlos Pascual to appeal to the Mexican government to deport Valdez to the U.S., where he faces charges of drug trafficking.

Valdez denies all charges against him, and denies that he was responsible for any beheadings.

A spokesman for the U.S. Embassy said it deferred to the Mexican government on the deportation issue. A spokeswoman for the U.S. Justice Department wouldn’t comment specifically on the request.

Valdez is being held for a 40-day period while Mexican police investigate charges against him. Mexican officials say they will decide later on whether he will face charges in Mexico or whether he will be deported to the U.S., where he faces charges of trafficking tons of cocaine in Georgia, Texas and Louisiana.

A spokeswoman for the office of Mexico’s attorney general said Valdez is being held at federal police headquarters, where he is safe.

The deportation request is an unusual one in the history of Latin American drug trafficking. In the 1980s, Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar led a bombing campaign against the government there partly to avoid being sent to the U.S. More recently, scores of Mexican drug traffickers have been forcibly extradited to the U.S.

Valdez, 37 years old, is the first major suspected Mexican drug lord captured alive since his former boss, Arturo Beltran Leyva, known as the “Boss of Bosses,” was killed in a gunbattle with Mexican marines in December. Ignacio Coronel, a leading figure in the Sinaloa Cartel, died in a gunfight with Mexican soldiers in July.

Since Valdez has worked with most of Mexico’s top drug barons, including the country’s most powerful trafficker, Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, he could provide officials with valuable intelligence, analysts say.

Born and raised in the border city of Laredo, Texas, Valdez was a high-school football standout who went on to become one of Mexico’s most-wanted criminals.

Valdez’s deportation would raise the possibility that the alleged drug lord could cut a deal for a reduced sentence with U.S. authorities in exchange for information.

Speed is of the essence, as the Mexican prison system is notoriously dangerous and Valdez has a lot of enemies.

Two weeks ago, José Luis Carrizales, who like Valdez was an alleged enforcer for the Sinaloa cartel, was killed just hours after being transferred to the penitentiary in the border city of Nuevo Laredo, which is largely controlled by a rival drug gang known as the Zetas.

Controversy has swirled around Valdez since his arrest last week. He startled many Mexicans by smiling during his presentation to reporters in Mexico’s version of the “perp walk.” Many newspaper and TV commentators speculated that the smile suggested Valdez hadn’t been captured, as the government says, but voluntarily surrendered in exchange for a lighter sentence. Conflicting versions of Valdez’s capture have fed the controversy. Mexican media, basing their accounts on a police report, said Valdez was arrested after federal police pulled over his three-car convoy for speeding. According to this account, the police didn’t know who they had stopped until Valdez got out, identified himself and surrendered.

The official government version, sketchy on details, said Valdez was captured after his rural estate was surrounded by federal police in the culmination of a yearlong search.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, Interpol Litigation, International Extradition and OFAC Litigation.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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