Suspect in 2001 Murder Arrested in Mexico Faces Extradition to US

September 8, 2011

A fugitive was arrested this week in Mexico in connection with a Schaumburg slaying that went cold for 10 years.

Jose Camacho, 43, was arrested by Mexican police and is expected to be extradited to the U.S. on first-degree murder charges in the 2001 death of 28-year-old Flavio Venancio, of Hanover Park, Schaumburg police said Wednesday.

On May 25, 2001, Venancio was found by a mosquito abatement employee floating in a pond near the Schaumburg Metra station. An autopsy showed Venancio had been beaten, stabbed and drowned.

Investigators believe Camacho, who also once lived in Hanover Park, stabbed Venancio during an alcohol-fueled argument. The two were acquaintances and had been drinking in Hanover Park the night of Venancio’s death, said Sgt. John Nebl.

The pair decided to go out to buy food and more beer when they took a wrong turn, ending up near the Schaumburg train station and crashed their car into a guard rail, Nebl said. At that point, an argument broke out and Venancio was stabbed, he said.

Investigators within weeks identified Camacho as the offender, and issued an arrest warrant for first-degree murder charges. But, Nebl said, Camacho fled the state around that time.

Police said he was living in Anaheim, Calif., for a while, but learned in the last year Camacho was in Mexico. A 2009 FBI profile of Camacho led to his whereabouts, Nebl said, adding he couldn’t go into specifics on how police found him.

Nebl said he isn’t sure of the circumstances surrounding Camacho’s arrest in Mexico. Cook County prosecutors are working with the Mexican government in the extradition process. No hearing dates have been set.

“This doesn’t happen very often in Schaumburg,” Nebl said. “For us to have such a long time (without an arrest) in a case of this nature, it is more of a rarity.”

Venancio, who was a janitor in Streamwood, arrived in the United States from Mexico about nine months before he died, police said at the time of his death. Venancio also used the name Pasqual Fernandez, according to police.

This article was written by Kate Thayer and published by TribLocal Reporter on September 7, 2011.

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

Bookmark and Share


Mexico Extradites Flight Attendant Who Set Fire on U.S. Flight

August 5, 2011

Latin American Herald Tribune on August 4, 2011 released the following:

“MEXICO CITY – The Mexican Attorney General’s Office said Thursday it extradited a former flight attendant who had fled the United States after his arrest for setting fire to a plane’s bathroom.

Eder H. Rojas, a Mexican national, was wanted for extradition by a federal court in North Dakota for setting the fire 35 minutes after the Compass Airlines flight carrying 76 people took off in 2008 from Minneapolis bound for Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Rojas, then 19, another flight attendant and a passenger extinguished the blaze after the fire alarm sounded, but the plane still was forced make an emergency landing in the North Dakota city of Fargo.

After being questioned by FBI agents, Rojas confessed that he was upset with the airline for making him work the Minneapolis-Regina route and that was why he used a lighter to set fire to a packet of toilet paper in the plane’s bathroom.

Other flight crew members testified that Rojas had asked for an extra packet of toilet paper before the plane took off and that led investigators to suspect the Mexican, who eventually confessed.

After his arrest, the suspect escaped from a low-security detention facility and fled across the border into Mexico.

Rojas was subsequently arrested in Mexico by Federal Police officers and jailed in Mexico City, the AG’s office said in a statement.

The Mexican government extradited Rojas after he had exhausted all avenues of appeal and the suspect was handed over at the Mexico City airport to a group of U.S. Marshals, the AG’s office said.

Rojas faces up to 20 years in prison. EFE”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

Bookmark and Share


Man Accused of 1982 Murder of 2 Girls, Captured in Mexico Awaits Extradition to US

July 28, 2011

It could take up to a year to extradite a 51-year-old Mexican national recently arrested in Tijuana on suspicion of raping and murdering two Stockton girls in 1982, an official said Wednesday.

Alfredo Reyes Reyes was on the lam for 29 years, U.S. officials say, ever since he and a second man now on California’s death row killed Renee Rontal and Nancy Rubia, both 13.

The FBI and Mexican federal police arrested Reyes on May 27 in a Tijuana pool hall, and he remains in the custody of Mexican officials.

According to a treaty between Mexico and the United States, prosecutors had a two-month deadline upon Reyes’ arrest to file their extradition request with Mexican officials.

San Joaquin County Deputy District Attorney Kevin Mayo, who is working with the U.S. State Department in Washington, said they’ve done all that.

“We’ve made all the deadlines,” he said. “Sometimes it can take up to a year (for the extradition). Sometimes it’s quicker.”

After a farm worker found the murdered girls, Jan. 25, 1982, on a Delta island, San Joaquin County sheriff’s detectives arrested Antonio Espinoza, now 50, who remains on death row at San Quentin State Prison.

Reyes, however, evaded capture, fleeing to his native Mexico.

Because Mexico officially abolished capital punishment in 2005, San Joaquin County prosecutors in their extradition request have had to assure Mexican officials they won’t seek a death sentence against Reyes.

Mayo, who helped prepare the request for Reyes, said his concern now is whether the documents were filed correctly in the eyes of Mexican officials.

“We haven’t heard that (there is a problem),” he said. “I guess now it’s a matter of waiting for the Mexican folks to respond.”

This article was written by Scott Smith and published by Recordnet.com on July 28, 2011.

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

Bookmark and Share


Man Accused of Murdering his Estranged Wife and Unborn Child Extradited from Mexico

July 28, 2011

A man accused in the stabbing death of his estranged wife, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer, was extradited to Chula Vista, California on Wednesday from Mexico.

Jesus Arteaga Garcia, 30, will be charged in the death of Maribel Arteaga, 28, and her unborn child. She was two months pregnant when she was fatally stabbed on Dec. 9, 2009, at her Chula Vista apartment in front of the couple’s two sons, who were ages 4 and 6 at the time.

Chula Vista police investigated and obtained an arrest warrant for Arteaga, who was believed at the time to have fled to Mexico to avoid prosecution.

On Jan. 28, Mexican federal authorities, working with deputies from the U.S. Marshals Service, arrested Arteaga in Tijuana near his sister’s apartment. He was being held in Mexico City before extradition.

On Wednesday, U.S. Marshals Service deputies transported him to San Diego and released him to the custody of Chula Vista police investigators. He will face two counts of murder, two counts of child abuse, and a special circumstances allegation for committing more than one murder. He was being held in county jail on a no-bail warrant.

At the time of the arrest, Deputy U.S. Marshal Steve Jurman said that Arteaga was receiving assistance in Tijuana from his sister and his parents, who also live there.

Maribel Arteaga worked as a customs officer at the Tecate Port of Entry.

Her estranged husband had come to her apartment, and the two had argued about the visitation of their children, authorities said. She was stabbed in the back with a long-blade knife and died at a hospital. Before she died, she identified her estranged husband as the assailant.

Chula Vista Police Chief David Bejarano called the extradition “another important step in bringing justice to Maribel’s family.”

Jurman said earlier that relatives in Tijuana were apparently sympathetic to Jesus Arteaga, and that during interviews with authorities, they said that “Maribel got what she deserved.”

This article was written by Susan Schroder and published by Sign On San Diego on July 27, 2011.

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

Bookmark and Share