“Former Guatemalan President Pleads Not Guilty After Extradition”

May 29, 2013

The Wall Street Journal on May 28, 2013 released the following press release:

“Samuel Rubenfeld
Wall Street Journal

A former Guatemalan president was extradited last Friday to New York to face money laundering charges, the latest in the Justice Department’s heightened efforts to get defendants detained internationally to face corruption charges.

Alfonso Portillo,who led Guatemala from 2000 to 2004, embezzled tens of millions of dollars in state assets, some of which he laundered through U.S. and European bank accounts, prosecutors alleged Tuesday.

Portillo pleaded not guilty on Tuesday in a hearing before U.S. District Judge Robert Patterson. If convicted, Portillo faces a maximum of 20 years in prison.

He has long denied the allegations against him, telling CNN en Español in January the charges are a political witch-hunt borne of his opposition to the U.S.-led Iraq war.

“If deposits were made, they are deposits that first of all come from institutions that are not illicit,” he was quoted by CNN as saying. “In order for there to be laundering, the first requirement is that the money is from an illegal origin or comes from an illegal activity.”

Portillo’s extradition to the U.S. highlights a recently favored tool in corruption cases by law enforcement authorities, in which people are detained overseas and brought to the U.S. to face the charges against them.

The Justice Department built up its capacity and bolstered its relationships with foreign counterparts, allowing it to more frequently pursue cases and defendants internationally, said Peter Carr, a spokesman, in an email.

“The result is we are pursuing the extradition of more defendants, including high-profile defendants, such as [Viktor] Bout and Portillo,” Carr said.

However, the results of these efforts are somewhat mixed, based on a review of recent cases.

Bout was extradited and convicted, and sentenced to 25 years in prison. His associate was extradited to New York last week.

In January, a U.K. businessman was extradited, pleaded guilty and was sentenced in El Paso, Texas, federal court to three years behind bars for trying to help ship missile parts to Iran.

And in April 2012, the leader of a Mexican drug cartel was brought to the U.S. to face racketeering and money-laundering charges, for which he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 25 years in prison.

But prosecutors are struggling to bring a former Thai official to the U.S. to face money-laundering charges in a case that’s been stayed until March 2014, and their support to Bahamian authorities in another case still ended in failure.

In another case, prosecutors have been trying to extradite a South Korean man since 2009 to face U.S. foreign bribery charges, but court papers from the man’s lawyers say Seoul won’t do it because the people he’s accused of bribing aren’t considered public officials under local law.

Carr declined to comment on the Justice Department’s record of extradition.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

————————————————————–

We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Guatemala here.

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


Guatemala court OKs extradition of suspected drug boss to U.S.

June 14, 2012

Reuters on June 13, 2012 released the following:

“(Reuters) – A Guatemalan court authorized on Wednesday the extradition to the United States of Horst Overdick, who is accused of being one of Central America’s top drug traffickers with close ties to Mexico’s brutal Zetas gang.

Overdick, 44, nicknamed “the Tiger,” was arrested in April and judges ruled he was responsible for overseeing large shipments of cocaine from South America to the United States.

The court also said that Overdick helped build clandestine runways to land cocaine shipments in Guatemala and stored the drugs in warehouses.

Guatemalan President Otto Perez must ratify the extradition.

Interior Minister Mauricio Lopez has said Overdick was the most important link in Guatemala for the Zetas, the drug cartel founded by deserters from the Mexican army that has expanded into Central America.

In May 2011, the Zetas beheaded 27 farm workers in northern Guatemala in a dispute with the farm’s owner over cocaine shipments to the United States.

A New York district court has requested Overdick’s extradition on charges that he helped ship 1,200 kg (2,650 pounds) of cocaine to the United States in 2002.

(Reporting by Mike McDonald; Editing by Peter Cooney)”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

————————————————————–

We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Guatemala here.

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


Guatemala to possibly extradite alleged Sinaloa cartel member to the United States (U.S.)

June 13, 2012

Fox News Latino on June 13, 2012 released the following:

“Guatemala to extradite Sinaloa cartel member to U.S.

A Guatemalan court has given the United States 40 working days to present evidence against Walter Alirio Montejo, a Guatemalan suspected of belonging to Mexico’s Sinaloa cartel and the subject of a U.S. extradition request, judicial officials said.

Montejo was arrested Sunday in Huehuetenango, a province on the border with Mexico.

The suspect appeared before a criminal court in Guatemala City on Tuesday and refused to make a statement.

The court has given a U.S. federal court in the District of Columbia time to present evidence to back the extradition request.

The 38-year-old Montejo allegedly belongs to the Sinaloa cartel, Mexico’s oldest and most powerful drug trafficking organization, and is wanted on drug charges in the United States.

An arrest warrant was issued for Montejo by U.S. authorities in 2010, judicial officials said.

Montejo allegedly received drugs in Guatemala from South America that were bound for the United States.

The suspect belonged to the Los Lorenzana gang, which smuggled drugs into Mexico from Huehuetenango, judicial officials said, adding that the narcotics were later smuggled into the United States.

Montejo, according to Guatemalan authorities, was the target of a hit in November 2008 that sparked a shootout between Mexican and Guatemalan drug traffickers that left 17 people dead in a village in Huehuetenango.

Waldemar Lorenzana, the suspected leader of the Los Lorenzana gang, was arrested in April 2011 at the request of the United States, where he is the subject of an extradition case.

Guatemalan authorities have not yet acted on the request for the extradition of Lorenzana, who faces drug charges in the United States.

Elio Lorenzana, Waldemar’s son, was arrested in Guatemala in November 2011 and his extradition was authorized in February.

The Sinaloa cartel is led by Joaquin “El Chapo” (Shorty) Guzman, who was arrested in Guatemala in 1993 and pulled off a Hollywood-style jailbreak when he escaped from the Puente Grande maximum-security prison in the western Mexican state of Jalisco on Jan. 19, 2001.

The Sinaloa organization is sometimes referred to by officials as the Pacific cartel.

Guzman, considered extremely violent, is one of the most-wanted criminals in Mexico and the United States, where the Drug Enforcement Administration has offered a reward of $5 million for him. EFE”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

————————————————————–

We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Guatemala here.

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email: