Former Policeman Mark Russell is Extradited to Jamaica from the United States To Face a Murder Charge

June 18, 2012

The Gleaner on June 17, 2012 released the following:

“Ex-Cop Extradited! – Jamaica Foots The Bill As US Sends Policeman Back To Island To Face Murder Trial

In a historic move last Friday, a former cop – Mark Russell – was finally extradited from the United States (US) to face a murder charge in Jamaica.

Russell was quietly escorted back to the island last Friday afternoon by two members of the local police force almost five years after the July 2007 murder of 18-year-old Ravin Thompson and three years after Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) Paula Llewellyn ruled that he and another former policeman, Morris Lee, were to be charged with the killing of the teenager.

Both men reportedly fled the country before the DPP ruled on the killing.

“It is historic!” Llewellyn said of the return of the former cop.

“(Or) let us put it this way, I can understand if some persons would characterise it as historic,” said Llewellyn, as she told The Sunday Gleaner that she could not recall another case involving a person being extradited from the US to Jamaica to face criminal proceedings.

“I’ve been a prosecutor at the office for the last maybe 26 years … . I certainly would have to say that I have never seen before a former police officer who was on the run being extradited back to Jamaica … ,” said Llewellyn.

“I am aware that he has been extradited to Jamaica. So the next step is that we don our Office of the DPP hat pursuant to section 94 of the Constitution and we proffer a voluntary bill of indictment charging him for murder.”

Llewellyn lauded deputy DPP Jeremy Taylor, head of the extradition unit, and other members of team for their contribution to the case. She also heaped praises on her counterparts in the US.

“I would also have to register my appreciation to our international partners at the justice department who we have always had an excellent working relationship with … and this is just another example as far as we are concerned of the product of that excellent working relationship … and long may it continue,” said Llewellyn.

The DPP explained that the Jamaican Government had to pay for Russell’s flight back to the island because in extradition matters the requesting State is required to foot the cost of repatriating the accused to its country.

“My information is that arrangements were made for law enforcement officers, I think two, to travel to the United States to pick him up and carry him back here,” she revealed.

Early last month, a court in the US threw out an appeal by the fugitive ex-member of the constabulary force, paving the way for his extradition.

The former constable was ordered extradited by a judge in New York last September.

Russell filed an appeal claiming that Jamaican prosecutors had mishandled the evidence relating to his extradition and that he could not get a fair trial here.

But, a US district judge dismissed the appeal and ruled that he should be sent to Jamaica to face the music.

Conflicting accounts

Thompson was killed in what the police said then was a shoot-out with gunmen. But relatives and others who claimed to have witnessed the incident disputed the report saying the teen was murdered by members of a joint police-military team that was on patrol in Whitfield Town, St Andrew.

Local commentators have often lambasted the extradition relations between the US and Jamaica, charging that it is lopsided as no one has ever been extradited from Jamaica’s neighbour up north to face criminal proceedings here.

Llewellyn told our news team that it was one of the regular consultations that her office has with its international partners that resulted in the initiating of the extradition proceedings that culminated on Friday.

“We usually do consultations – formal and informal – from time to time with our international partners at the US Depart-ment of Justice, and when the name came up we checked our files and discovered that it was the same Mark Russell who we had ruled on and that he had fled the jurisdiction,” she said.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

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We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Jamaica here.

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Jamaica forms govt task force to battle scams

May 4, 2012

The Final Call on May 4, 2012 released the following:

“BY DAVID MCFADDEN ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jamaica recently announced a new government task force April 26 to fight proliferating lottery scams that have made the Caribbean country a center for international telemarketing fraud.

The Jamaican and U.S. governments already have a three-year-old joint task force that has been dealing with the schemes, which mainly target elderly Americans, but the problem has gotten worse.

Julian Robinson, a senior official in Jamaica’s Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, told reporters the lottery scams will seriously damage Jamaica’s reputation as a Caribbean tourist destination and business center if they continue.

“The implications of the lotto scam touches and encompasses so many critical areas of our national life,’’ Mr. Robinson said while flanked by police commanders and other government officials in tourism, investment and foreign affairs.

He said at least “30,000 calls are made into the U.S. from Jamaica attempting to defraud’’ American citizens every day. The United States is Jamaica’s biggest trade partner and source of tourists.

Mr. Robinson cited recent media coverage as a reason why the new inter-ministerial task force has been named. His April 19 announcement came two days after The Associated Press published a report on the Jamaican scams.

Police on the island say there are very visible signs of the fraud-spawned riches in the hot spot for the gangs, St. James parish, where a growing number of teenagers and twenty-somethings from modest backgrounds are living very well without any obvious source of income.

Deputy Police Commissioner Glenmore Hinds said the violent fraud rings are recruiting students out of high schools, some as young as 14 years of age. One 15-year-old scammer was able to buy his mother a house and drove around his community in a luxury car, Mr. Hinds said.

The rising economic power of the swindlers is also having a corrupting influence on police.

“Gangs are now contracted to seek out revenge on competitors and in some cases corrupt policemen are also employed to work for and on behalf of the scammers,’’ Mr. Hinds said.

The young Jamaican con artists have become so brazen that they throw lavish street parties. “There are parishes where scammers use champagne to wash their cars and light money as part of their celebrations,’’ Mr. Hinds said.

The Jamaican and U.S. governments set up a joint task force three years ago to combat the scams. But complaints in the U.S. have increased dramatically every year and even the most conservative estimates put the yearly take from Jamaican scams at $300 million (185,609,375 pounds), up from about $30 million (18.5 million pounds) in 2009.

Mr. Hinds said several swindle suspects are expected to be extradited to the U.S. soon, but declined to specify how many. So far, there has not been a single extradition.

The scams started taking off in Jamaica roughly five years ago, at about the same time the island became a regional leader in call centers dedicated to customer service. Since 2006, many of the legitimate call centers have been based in Montego Bay, and that is where many of the fraud rings have popped up.

The schemes are so entrenched in Jamaica that some American police departments have started warning vulnerable elderly residents to be wary of calls from Jamaica’s 876 telephone code.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

————————————————————–

We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Jamaica here.

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call: mcnabb.mcnabbassociates

           Office Locations

Email: