Suspect in Child Molestation Case Extradited from Mexico

September 8, 2011

A suspected child molester wanted in Escondido was extradited to the United States on Wednesday after being arrested in Mexico, according to the Escondido Police Department.

Ricardo Lopez Borbon was booked into the Vista jail on two counts of child molestation and a charge of parole violation, Lt. Craig Carter said. The molestation charges stem from an incident that occurred Aug. 17, 2009, authorities said.

On that date, officers were called to investigate a sexual assault involving a 9-year-old girl. The victim was visiting an auto shop in the 1000 block of West Mission Avenue when a man assaulted her.

The officers found few leads in the case, Carter said. However, the following day, Escondido detectives received a call about a registered sex offender living in the city who had cut off his electronic monitoring device, Carter said.

Through questioning, detectives determined that the registrant was the suspect in the molestation case, Carter said. Eventually, a $2 million warrant was issued on Lopez Borbon, a naturalized U.S. citizen, police said.

During their investigation, authorities found that the suspect was in Mexico, police said. On Oct. 6, 2010, Mexican authorities arrested the man and began extradition procedures.

Lopez Borbon is scheduled to be arraigned Friday at the courthouse in Vista.

This article was written by Edward Sifuentes and published by the North County Times on September 7, 2011.

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Mexican Drug Cartel Leader Extradited to US to Face Drug Conspiracy Charges

August 23, 2011

On Monday, August 22, 2011 the Department of Justice released the following:

High-Ranking Member of Mexican Gulf Cartel Extradited to the United States to Face Drug Conspiracy Charges

Aurelio Cano-Flores, aka “Yankee” and “Yeyo,” a high-ranking member of the Mexican Gulf Cartel, has been extradited to the United States from Mexico to face drug conspiracy charges, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division and Administrator Michele M. Leonhart of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

Cano-Flores, 39, made his initial appearance today before U.S. Magistrate Judge John M. Facciola in the District of Columbia, after being extradited to the United States on Aug. 19, 2011. Cano-Flores was ordered detained in federal custody pending trial. Cano-Flores had been in the custody of Mexican authorities pending extradition since his arrest on June 10, 2009.

Cano-Flores was charged, along with 19 other defendants, in a superseding indictment returned on Nov. 4, 2010. He is charged with conspiracy to manufacture and distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine and 1,000 kilograms or more of marijuana for importation into the United States.

“As charged in the indictment, Cano-Flores led the Gulf Cartel’s drug trafficking activities in Camargo, Mexico,” said Assistant Attorney General Breuer. “Cano-Flores was allegedly responsible for ensuring that multi-ton quantities of cocaine, heroin and marijuana were shipped into the United States, and that the illegal drug proceeds were subsequently funneled back into Mexico. Together with our counterparts across the border, the Justice Department is committed to bringing cartel leaders and associates to justice for their crimes, and the violence and destruction they cause.”

“Today we have brought to a court of law Aurelio Cano-Flores, a major drug trafficker connected to the extreme violence of the Los Zetas and Gulf Cartels and who allegedly is responsible for transporting multi-ton quantities of drugs into the United States,” said DEA Administrator Leonhart. “This is part of a concerted, combined, and coordinated effort by Mexico and the United States to target the command and control of the drug trafficking cartels. This extradition is another example of our enduring commitment to bring to justice violent criminals who deny justice to others, and whose drugs are a threat to both our nations.”

According to court documents, Cano-Flores was a high-ranking member of the Gulf Cartel when it worked in close partnership with Los Zetas, collectively known as “The Company.” The Gulf Cartel allegedly transported shipments of cocaine and marijuana by motor vehicles from Mexico to cities in Texas for distribution to other cities within the United States. The indictment alleges that Cano-Flores, his co-defendants and others organized, directed, and carried out various acts of violence against Mexican law enforcement officers and rival drug traffickers to retaliate against and to intimidate anyone who interfered with, or who were perceived to potentially interfere with, the cocaine and marijuana trafficking activities of the Gulf Cartel.

According to the indictment, from June 2006 until his arrest, Cano-Flores’s role was to oversee drug trafficking activities in Camargo, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, including procuring for distribution significant quantities of cocaine, heroin and bulk marijuana. Cano-Flores also is alleged to have coordinated the movement of illegal narcotics from Mexico into the United States as well as the repatriation of drug proceeds into Mexico. The Gulf Cartel controls most of the cocaine and marijuana trafficking through the Matamoros, Mexico, corridor to the United States. Los Zetas began as the enforcement wing of the Gulf Cartel, but has emerged in recent years as an independent drug trafficking organization.

On April 15, 2009, under the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act, the President identified Los Zetas as a Significant Foreign Narcotics Trafficker. On July 20, 2009, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) also identified the leadership of Los Zetas, Heriberto Lazcano-Lazcano and Miguel Angel Trevino Morales, as Significant Foreign Narcotics Traffickers. Both men are named as co-defendants in the indictment charging Cano-Flores. On July 25, 2011, an executive order was issued that blocks the transfer, payment or export of property belonging to certain transnational criminal organizations, including Los Zetas.

The department expressed its gratitude and appreciation to the government of Mexico for its cooperation and assistance in the apprehension and extradition of Cano-Flores.

An indictment is merely an allegation, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

If convicted, Cano-Flores faces a mandatory minimum of 10 years in prison and a maximum penalty of life in prison.

The case is being prosecuted by trial attorneys from the Criminal Division’s Narcotic and Dangerous Drug Section. The Criminal Division’s Office of International Affairs provided significant assistance in the extradition. The investigation in this case was led by the DEA’s Houston Field Division and the DEA Bilateral Investigation Unit.

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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U.S. – Mexico Extradition Treaty may mean No Death Penalty for Simon Lopez

August 3, 2011

Simon Lopez, charged in Smith County, Texas with the beating death of his girlfriend’s one-year-old son, may not face the death penalty.

Smith County district attorney Matt Bingham says he’s not sure yet if his office will seek the death penalty for Lopez, who is charged with capital murder in connection with the November 2010 death. Bingham says he’s still looking into the parameters of a U.S. – Mexico extradition treaty which limits the use of the death penalty against defendants extradited to the United States from Mexico.

Lopez was arrested last week in Mexico after months on the run and brought back to Smith County to face charges. He was arraigned Monday on a capital murder charge and remains in the Smith County Jail on a bond of $2 million.

This article was written by Catherine Khalil and published by KYTX on August 2, 2011.

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Man Accused of Murdering his Estranged Wife and Unborn Child Extradited from Mexico

July 28, 2011

A man accused in the stabbing death of his estranged wife, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer, was extradited to Chula Vista, California on Wednesday from Mexico.

Jesus Arteaga Garcia, 30, will be charged in the death of Maribel Arteaga, 28, and her unborn child. She was two months pregnant when she was fatally stabbed on Dec. 9, 2009, at her Chula Vista apartment in front of the couple’s two sons, who were ages 4 and 6 at the time.

Chula Vista police investigated and obtained an arrest warrant for Arteaga, who was believed at the time to have fled to Mexico to avoid prosecution.

On Jan. 28, Mexican federal authorities, working with deputies from the U.S. Marshals Service, arrested Arteaga in Tijuana near his sister’s apartment. He was being held in Mexico City before extradition.

On Wednesday, U.S. Marshals Service deputies transported him to San Diego and released him to the custody of Chula Vista police investigators. He will face two counts of murder, two counts of child abuse, and a special circumstances allegation for committing more than one murder. He was being held in county jail on a no-bail warrant.

At the time of the arrest, Deputy U.S. Marshal Steve Jurman said that Arteaga was receiving assistance in Tijuana from his sister and his parents, who also live there.

Maribel Arteaga worked as a customs officer at the Tecate Port of Entry.

Her estranged husband had come to her apartment, and the two had argued about the visitation of their children, authorities said. She was stabbed in the back with a long-blade knife and died at a hospital. Before she died, she identified her estranged husband as the assailant.

Chula Vista Police Chief David Bejarano called the extradition “another important step in bringing justice to Maribel’s family.”

Jurman said earlier that relatives in Tijuana were apparently sympathetic to Jesus Arteaga, and that during interviews with authorities, they said that “Maribel got what she deserved.”

This article was written by Susan Schroder and published by Sign On San Diego on July 27, 2011.

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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