“Alleged Bulgarian Cybercriminal Extradited to U.S.”

July 3, 2013

eSecurity Planet on July 3, 2013 released the following:

“Aleksi Kolarov faces up to 30 years in prison for his involvement in the Shadowcrew carding forum.

By Jeff Goldman

Bulgarian national Aleksi Kolarov, 30, has been extradited from Paraguay to face charges that he participated in the operation of the Shadowcrew carding forum, which was dismantled by the U.S. Justice Department and the Secret Service in 2004.

When Kolarov was arrested by Paraguayan law enforcement authorities on June 14, 2011, he was found in possession in hundreds of thousands of dollars in various currencies, counterfeit payment cards, and equipment for re-encoding cards.

“Aleksi Kolorov is charged with conspiring in the most notorious online cybercrime marketplace of its time, selling the means to steal money and identities to other criminals,” U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman said in a statement. “This extradition shows that hiding behind computers and borders does not deter us. It is vital that law enforcement work internationally to bring cybercriminals to justice, no matter how long it takes.”

Kolarov has been charged with one count of conspiracy, one count of transferring false identification documents, and one count of offering access devices without authorization.

If convicted, he faces up to 30 years in prison and a fine of up to $750,000, or twice the gross amount of pecuniary gain or loss resulting from the offense.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

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We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Paraguay here.

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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“Megaupload founder wins access to evidence seized in raid”

June 3, 2013

Reuters on May 31, 2013 released the following:

“(Reuters) – A New Zealand court granted Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom access on Friday to all evidence seized by police in a 2012 raid, bolstering the Internet entrepreneur’s fight against extradition to the United States to face online piracy charges.

Repeating its decision that warrants used in the raid on Dotcom’s home were illegal, the High Court ruled that police must provide copies of evidence considered relevant to the U.S. investigation. These include materials forwarded to the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Any evidence seized in the raid, including computers, hard drives, files, and other materials deemed irrelevant must be returned to the founder of the shuttered file-sharing site.

“The police are to review digital data storage devices and return any to the plaintiffs that contain no relevant material,” Justice Helen Winkelmann said in a statement. Police, she said, may retain other storage devices but had to “provide a clone of those devices to the plaintiffs”.

Acting on a request from U.S. authorities, New Zealand police arrested Dotcom and three colleagues.

Dotcom’s lawyers have argued that lack of access to the seized evidence put them at a disadvantage in defending the German national and his colleagues against extradition.

The United States has launched a criminal investigation into Megaupload, arguing that it facilitated online piracy, and participated in racketeering and money laundering.

Dotcom, who has New Zealand residency, says the site was merely a storage facility for online files and should not be held accountable if stored content was obtained illegally.

An extradition hearing is scheduled for August, but may be delayed due to separate cases linked to another court ruling that unlawful warrants were used in the police raid.

The copyright case could set a precedent for Internet liability laws and, depending on its outcome, may force entertainment companies to rethink their distribution methods.

The U.S. Justice Department says Megaupload cost copyright holders such as movie studios and record companies more than $500 million and generated more than $175 million in criminal proceeds. It described the case as being among the largest ever involving criminal copyright.

Dotcom launched a new file-sharing service, Mega, in January.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

————————————————————–

We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and New Zealand here.

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


Judge Ponders Canadian Man’s Extradition to the United States

October 17, 2012

ABC News on October 17, 2012 released the following:

EDMONTON, Alberta
Associated Press

“A judge will rule Friday whether to extradite a Canadian man to the United States on charges that he helped coordinate Tunisian jihadists believed responsible for separate suicide attacks in Iraq in 2009 that killed five American soldiers outside a U.S. base and seven people at an Iraqi police complex.

Sayfildin Tahir Sharif, who holds dual Canadian and Iraqi citizenship, was arrested in 2011 on a U.S. warrant and has been fighting extradition to New York.

The prosecution contends that evidence from intercepted Internet and phone conversations shows that Sharif was directly involved in supporting terrorists who conducted the suicide bombings.

Sharif, 40, never left Canada as part of the alleged conspiracy. He was born in Iraq but moved to Toronto as a refugee in 1993 and became a Canadian citizen. He has also gone by other names, including Faruq Muhammad’Isa.

His lawyer, Bob Aloneissi, argued in final submissions Tuesday that the prosecution provided no clear evidence that Sharif helped support a terrorist group.

Aloneissi said Sharif’s right to legal advice was violated when the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, FBI and U.S. Justice Department officials interrogated him immediately following his Jan. 19, 2011, arrest at an Edmonton apartment.

A U.S. Department of Justice investigator interviewed him with an FBI agent and a RCMP corporal present, the extradition request said. The interview “was conducted in compliance with United States law,” with Muhammad ‘Isa signing a waiver before voluntarily answering questions, it said.

During the interview, Muhammad ‘Isa admitted he corresponded by email from Canada with two of the terrorists while they were in Syria, and knew that they were on a mission to kill Americans, the paperwork says. The documents allege he corresponded with “facilitators” who were trying to get the attackers into Iraq, and wired one of them $700.

Justice Adam Germain of Edmonton Court of Queen’s Bench reserved his ruling until Friday.

Germain pointed out the standard of evidence required to extradite someone is much lower than is required for use in a criminal trial.

On Monday, Germain ruled that videotaped statements that Sharif made to police during his interrogation would be admitted as evidence.

If convicted of terrorism charges in the United States, Sharif could face a maximum sentence of life imprisonment.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

————————————————————–

We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Canada here.

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


Estonia OKs extradition of suspected hacker to US

March 21, 2012

WKOW.com on March 15, 2012 released the following:

“TALLINN, Estonia (AP) – Estonia has approved the extradition of a suspected hacker to the United States where he is accused in a cyber fraud scheme that infected millions of computers worldwide, including those of NASA.

The government said Thursday that 26-year-old Anton Ivanov, an Estonian citizen, is facing charges including computer hacking and online fraud. The U.S. Justice Department had asked Estonia to extradite him.

Ivanov was arrested in November with five other Estonian citizens following a two-year investigation led by the FBI with assistance from the Estonian authorities. The others, including main suspect Vladimir Tsastsin, also face extradition. A Russian suspect in the case remains at large.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

————————————————————–

We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Estonia here.

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


US fugitive wants to serve time in Portugal

September 30, 2011

Forbes.com on August 30, 2011 released the following:

“By BARRY HATTON

LISBON, Portugal — An American killer and alleged hijacker who was a fugitive for 41 years should serve the rest of his jail time in Portugal where he was captured instead of being extradited to the United States, his lawyer says.

George Wright, 68, deserves to serve the remainder of his 15- to 30-year New Jersey murder sentence in Portugal because he has lived in the country for decades, has a Portuguese wife and grown Portuguese children, said the lawyer, Manuel Luis Ferreira.

“If he has to serve, then he wants it to be here, which is his home,” Ferreira told Portugal’s TVI television late Thursday.

Wright broke out of the Bayside State Prison in Leesburg, New Jersey, on Aug. 19, 1970, after serving about 7 1/2 years of his sentence for killing a man in a 1962 gas station robbery. He then was part of a Black Liberation Army group that hijacked a U.S. plane to Algeria in 1972.

Wright was captured in a seaside village near Lisbon on Monday after authorities matched his fingerprint on a Portuguese identity card to one in the United States.

Ferreira said Wright will oppose extradition on the ground that he fears reprisals for his past membership in the militant U.S. group. He did not elaborate.

He said his client had been living openly in Portugal and even had a Facebook page.

“He wasn’t running. He wasn’t hiding,” Ferreira told TVI.

But Ferreira didn’t mention that Wright lived in Portugal under the alias Jose Luis Jorge dos Santos, which was listed on his Portuguese residency card.

Wright’s children, said to be in their early 20s, knew nothing about his past until his capture this week, according to Ferreira.

Ann Patterson, whose father Walter was killed by Wright, said she wanted him sent back to the United States.

“I honestly think he should serve (his sentence) where he did the crime,” she told The Associated Press. “I feel sorry for his children. I would not wish them to go through what my sister and I went through. He chose the crime and when you choose the crime you choose the punishment that goes with it.”

U.S. Justice Department spokeswoman Laura Sweeney declined to comment on the defense counsel’s arguments due to the pending nature of the extradition request.

Ferreira did not outline his legal strategy for trying to prevent Wright from being extradited to face charges in the plane hijacking. He said Friday that he was too busy to discuss the case.

U.S. officials so far have only discussed Wright’s past murder conviction, not any possible future charges from the hijacking.

Hijacking in the United States carries a possible penalty of life in prison, and Portugal does not allow people to be extradited if they will face more than the nation’s maximum sentence of 25 years.

Under Portuguese law, citizens can serve sentences handed down in a foreign country in Portugal. But Portuguese officials say there is doubt about the validity of Wright’s identification documents and whether he is a national. They declined to elaborate because public access to information about court cases is restricted.

A photocopy of a Portuguese identity card issued to Wright in 1993 listed his home country as Guinea-Bissau, where he lived in the 1980s. A foreigner marrying a Portuguese is entitled to Portuguese nationality, but has to formally request it and it is not known whether Wright did.

Wright – dressed as a priest and using an alias – is accused of hijacking a Delta flight from Detroit to Miami in 1972 along with four other Black Liberation Army members and some children.

Wright arrived in Portugal in 1978, his attorney said. Wright also spent years in the 1980s living openly under his own name in Guinea-Bissau, a former Portuguese colony in West Africa, and even socialized with U.S. embassy officials there.

Ferreira said he marveled at Wright’s saga, which covered three continents and four decades.

“This story would make a television series. I’m still trying to digest it myself,” he said.

Wright is being held in Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, pending extradition hearings and will likely remain in detention for at least several weeks during the hearings, according to the president of the Lisbon court overseeing the case. Wright has asked to be freed during the process, a request that is still pending.

If he loses, he can appeal the extradition decision to Portugal’s Supreme Court and the country’s Constitutional Court, a process likely to last months or even years, the judge, Luis Maria Vaz das Neves, told The AP.

A recent high-profile extradition case involving an Indian terror suspect took years to resolve.

Abu Salem, arrested in Portugal in September 2002, was a prime suspect in 1993 bombings that struck Bombay, killing 257 people and wounding more than 1,100. He was extradited three years later after his appeals to higher courts failed.

But to get Portugal to extradite Salem, India had to promise to forgo the death penalty and impose a prison term of 25 years or less if he’s convicted, Indian officials said.

Wright was convicted of the 1962 murder of a gas station owner in Wall, New Jersey.

In the 1972 hijacking, Wright and the other Black Liberation Army members released the plane’s 86 other passengers for a $1 million ransom. They then forced the plane to fly to Boston, then onto Algeria, where the hijackers sought asylum. Algeria returned the plane and the money to the United States but allowed the hijackers to stay.

Wright and the other hijackers left Algeria in late 1972 or early 1973 and settled in France, according to Mikhael Ganouna, producer of the 2010 documentary “Nobody Knows my Name” about the hijacking.

But Wright left the group, and his associates were subsequently tracked down, arrested and convicted in Paris in 1976. The French government, however, refused to extradite them to the United States.

Douglas McNabb, a Washington-based lawyer who has defended people in extradition cases for more than 20 years, said he expects the U.S. to add some charges related to the hijacking to make an example of Wright.

“This taints the U.S’s, image that someone could be gone and not found as long as he was,” McNabb said.

However, Danielle Hunter, a spokeswoman for the New Jersey Department of Corrections, said there has not been talk so far of adding charges relating to Wright’s prison escape.

Norris Gelman, the Philadelphia lawyer who represented Ira Einhorn, who fled the U.S. in 1981 just before a trial for the murder of his ex-girlfriend in 1977 and was returned to the U.S. in 2001, said he expects authorities to pursue Wright to the end now that they have found him.

The U.S. “will move heaven and earth to get him back here, and I believe they will be successful. If they have to do it through diplomacy, they will do it through diplomacy,” he said. “I will tell you on good authority, time will not heal this wound.””

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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