U.S. asks Iraq to extradite Hezbollah suspect

June 4, 2012

The West Australian on June 2, 2012 released the following:

“Phil Stewart, Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The United States has formally asked Iraq to extradite a suspected Hezbollah operative accused of killing American troops, a U.S. official told Reuters, amid heightened concerns in Washington that he may go free.

It was not immediately clear when the request was filed and Iraqi officials approached by Reuters denied knowledge of it, casting doubt on whether an extradition was seriously being considered at this point in Baghdad.

The fate of Ali Mussa Daqduq has been vexing American officials since last December, when the United States was forced to hand him over to Baghdad after failing to secure a custody deal ahead of the U.S. military’s withdrawal from the country.

At the time, the White House said it had received assurances from Baghdad that Daqduq would be tried for allegedly orchestrating a 2007 kidnapping that resulted in the killing of five U.S. military personnel. But an Iraqi court earlier this month cleared him of the charges, citing a lack of evidence.

Daqduq’s attorney confirmed that the Lebanese-born suspect remained in Iraqi custody but scoffed at the suggestion that Daqduq might face American courts.

“The Americans have no right to get him,” Abdulalmehdi al-Mutiri, Daqduq’s lawyer, told Reuters. “Whatever they claim that he did, it would have happened on Iraqi soil and that means he is under Iraqi jurisdiction.”

Indeed, there are real questions about whether Iraq – which previously shunned U.S. efforts to retain custody of Daqduq – would respond positively to an extradition request.

The White House declined comment on whether any request had been made but President Barack Obama’s government has said it will pursue all legal options to bring justice to Daqduq.

REPUBLICAN CRITICISM

Republicans have sharply criticized Obama’s handling of the case. In a May 10 letter to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Attorney General Eric Holder, Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee asked whether any formal extradition request had been made for Daqduq, who was born in Lebanon.

“The U.S. has filed a formal extradition request” with the Iraqi government, a U.S. official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki’s media advisor Ali al-Moussawi said he was unaware of any extradition request for Daqduq and declined to be drawn into what he saw as a hypothetical question about how the Iraqi government would respond to one.

Asked about the possibility Daqduq might soon go free, the U.S. official confirmed: “That’s a real worry.”

Daqduq was captured in March 2007 and initially claimed he was a deaf mute. U.S. forces accused him of being a surrogate for Iran’s elite Quds force operatives and say he joined the Lebanese Hezbollah in 1983.

Daqduq’s attorney said a representative of Hezbollah had come to Iraq but left “because he felt he could not do anything more.”

“But legally Daqduq is clear, there are no charges against him,” Mutiri said.

If Daqduq were extradited, he would face charges for war crimes. A second U.S. official confirmed that charges filed against Daqduq in the U.S. military commissions system earlier this year included murder, attempted murder, attempted taking of hostages, spying, and terrorism.

It was not immediately clear where the U.S. military commission trial for Daqduq would be held if he were ultimately extradited. But Panetta last year told Congress that Daqduq would face “better justice” if tried by the United States.

FBI Director Robert Mueller said last month his department would be “willing and able” to cooperate with a military commission trial if the U.S. wins custody of Daqduq.

“In the meantime, however, we have cooperated with the Iraqi authorities in providing intelligence and information for their proceedings in Iraq,” Mueller told Congress.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

————————————————————–

We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Iraq here.

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call: mcnabb.mcnabbassociates

           Office Locations

Email:


Ecuador’s ambassador calls for Bristol prosecutors to turn over evidence in Brockton slayings; warns of appeal by Luis Guaman

May 18, 2012

The Boston Globe on May 18, 2012 released the following:

“By Maria Sacchetti, Globe Staff

Ecuador’s ambassador to the United States this week rejected US Senator John F. Kerry’s request to extradite a man accused of a Brockton double murder, and urged Kerry to support Ecuador’s decision to prosecute him there, according to a letter released to the media today.

Ambassador Nathalie Cely said in a letter to Kerry that Ecuador had worked “tirelessly” to obtain evidence from Massachusetts prosecutors needed to keep Luis Guaman in prison in Ecuador, where the constitution bars extradition of Ecuadoran citizens.

An Ecuadoran court last month convicted the 42-year-old roofer for the February 2011 murders of a mother and son in Brockton, based largely on the evidence outlined in the US extradition request, and sentenced Guaman to 25 years in prison.

Guaman’s defense lawyer has appealed, and he has pointed out during the trial that Massachusetts prosecutors did not send any physical evidence to bolster the case.

Cely wrote Kerry that Ecuadoran prosecutors cannot violate the nation’s constitution, but in letter, which was dated Tuesday, she urged Kerry to help secure evidence that would “guard against any potential appeal.”

“While I appreciate your disappointment about the decision to not extradite Mr. Guaman, I hope that you will consider supporting my government’s effort to obtain the evidence requested from the Massachusetts judicial authorities so that we can ensure he remains incarcerated for his full sentence,” she wrote to Kerry.

Cely was responding to a May 10 request by Kerry, who chairs the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, that Ecuador return Guaman to Massachusetts. Kerry, who joined Plymouth District Attorney Timothy J. Cruz and Senator Scott Brown in calling for the extradition, had expressed concern that Guaman could be freed in as little as 10 years, though the presiding judge in Guaman’s case said they expected him to serve the vast majority of his sentence.

In the letter, Cely pointed out that Ecuador has a long record of “active and ongoing” cooperation with the United States, including combating drug trafficking, terrorism, and human smuggling. She said Ecuador helped capture six Pakistani citizens involved in human trafficking last year.

Guaman, who lived in the United States illegally for almost two decades, has been indicted in Plymouth County for the bludgeoning deaths of his housemates Maria Avelina Palaguachi, 25, and her 2-year-old son Brian. He left the United States using another man’s passport hours after their bodies were found in a trash bin behind their house.

Cruz refused multiple requests from Ecuador to send evidence to bolster their case and called the trial a “sham.” Cruz has said that Ecuador’s constitution violates its preexisting extradition treaty with the United States and called for economic sanctions against the South American nation.

Cruz has also pointed out that Guaman would face a stiffer penalty of life in prison without parole in Massachusetts, if convicted.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

————————————————————–

We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Ecuador here.

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call: mcnabb.mcnabbassociates

           Office Locations

Email:


Colombia captures alleged drug trafficker who pioneered use of submarines

March 21, 2012

Pocono Record on March 18, 2012 released the following:

“By Fox News Latino

BOGOTA, Colombia — A drug trafficker who pioneered the use of submarines to smuggle cocaine has been captured in southwestern Colombia, the National Police said.

Jose Samir Renteria, who is the subject of a US extradition request, was arrested in Cali, the capital of Valle del Cauca province.

Renteria has links to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, guerrilla group and the Los Rastrojos gang, US officials said.

The suspect got involved in the illegal drug trade in the mid-1980s, when he allegedly began smuggling cocaine into the US using speedboats that operated out of Colombia’s Pacific coast.

Renteria became a partner of Neftali Umensa, one of the top leaders of the FARC’s 30th Front, who was killed by the army on Oct. 20.

US investigators determined that Renteria also had contacts and did business with Mexico’s Sinaloa cartel. Renteria, who is wanted on drug charges by a US federal court in Florida, is the subject of a Dec. 2, 2010, extradition request.

Colombian drug traffickers started using semi-submersibles in 1993. In that year, Colombia’s navy seized one of the vessels off Providencia Island in the Caribbean.

The semi-submersibles cannot dive like normal submarines, but are equipped with valves that, when opened by the operators, quickly flood the vessel, causing it and any drugs on board to quickly sink to an unrecoverable depth.

The crew then jumps overboard and, since no drugs are discovered, they avoid prosecution.

Since 1993, Colombian security forces have seized more than 50 of the vessels.

In September 2011, a sub with the capacity to haul at least 10 tons of drugs to Central America was seized from the FARC on Colombia’s southwestern Pacific coast by a police special operations unit.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
International Extradition Lawyers Videos:

International Extradition – When the FBI Seeks Extradition

International Extradition – Wire Transfer – Email – Telephone Call

————————————————————–

We previously discussed the extradition treaty between the United States and Colombia here.

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Australian Government Urges U.S. Extradition of Neil Campbell

October 25, 2010

The Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade says Australia is urging the U.S. to fast-track extradition of an Australian accused of bribery in Afghanistan.

The United States has lodged an extradition request for 61-year-old Neil Campbell, who is facing U.S. federal charges for allegedly accepting payments from undercover agents in Afghanistan.

DFAT says the indictment alleges Campbell solicited a payment of $190,000 to award building project contracts to a subcontractor.

Campbell was arrested at New Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport earlier this month.

In court yesterday, the judge said the court had not received a copy of the U.S. extradition request and remanded Campbell in custody until the next hearing.

The approval process is expected to take several weeks.

The Queenslander asked for permission to access his bank account to support his son and daughter. Campbell says he is ready and willing to go to the United States to defend himself.

The case is scheduled to reappear in court on November 1.

DFAT says Campbell has not sought legal representation, but he and his family are receiving consular assistance.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, Interpol Litigation, International Extradition and OFAC Litigation.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

Bookmark and Share